Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: When Street Art Meets Fine Art

Mural of two boxers dressed in 17th-century clothing by Conor Harrington part of the Dulwich Outdoor Gallery

Located in a tranquil pocket in South London, the Dulwich Outdoor Gallery is a unique London street art project. It was initiated in 2013 by the late Ingrid Beazly, art historian and volunteer educator at the fabulous Dulwich Picture Gallery. Passionate about street art and eager to break the barriers between urban art and fine art, Beazly invited street artists from all over the world to help create the remarkable Dulwich Outdoor Gallery. Get a taste of this fantastic open-air urban art project in this article.

Inspired by the Baroque paintings on display in the Dulwich Picture Gallery, the muralists were asked to recreate these world-famous classic artworks in their own unique style. The result? A wonderful collection of fine art in the streets of Dulwich. Unintentionally, the Dulwich Outdoor Gallery also became a vibrant tribute to founder Ingrid Beazly who sadly died from cancer in 2017 at the age of 67.

I’m pleased I had the pleasure of meeting Ingrid Beazly a couple of times. After I originally posted this article in January 2016, Ingrid left me a comment and invited me for a private tour at the Dulwich Art Gallery where she would tell me more about the project and show me the original paintings the murals were based on.

A few months later I were even to see her fantastic private urban art collection and even Alien memorabilia when she opened up her home for participants of a guided Dulwich street art tour during the Dulwich Festival. I was shocked to learn about her death not much later as she came across as such a vibrant, friendly and bright person with a passion for art. Passed away too soon, this post is a modest tribute to Beazly and a celebration of her lasting legacy.

Ingrid Beazly, founder of Dulwich Outdoor Gallery, looking at the Stik mural by her front door
Ingrid Beazly looking at the Stik mural the London street artist painted on her house

The mural by Stik on Ingrid Beazly’s house is based on the classic painting Elizabeth and Mary Linley by Thomas Gainsborough (1772).

Painting ‘Elizabeth and Mary Linley’ by Thomas Gainsborough
‘Elizabeth and Mary Linley’ by Thomas Gainsborough (1772) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: map of the street art murals

After my earlier street art explorations in Camden and Walthamstow, I made my way to yet another area in London I was previously unfamiliar with. At least the expanding London street art scene has made me discover new territories!

The first time I went to Dulwich in December of 2015, I started my self-guided street art walking tour at East Dulwich station and finished 2.5 hours later at Herne Hill station. I used the online map below to find the locations. When you click on the pins on the map, it gives you a short description of all the street artworks.

In this post you can see the majority of the Dulwich Outdoor Gallery street artworks alongside the classic paintings they’re based on. I’ll also give you the exact location of the murals in Dulwich and information on the artists. Be aware though that due to the fleeting nature of street art, not all paintings and artworks might still be there.

Want to discover more great London street art neighbourhoods? Find my complete London street art guide here!

1. Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Remi Rough and System (Vale End)

Street art mural in Dulwich, London, by Remi Rough and System based on the painting ‘A Girl at a Window’ by Rembrandt van Rijn
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Remi Rough and System (2013)

This colourful mural on Vale End, right opposite of East Dulwich station is a collaboration between UK artists System and Remi Rough. System painted the portrait of the young street artist, based on Rembrandt van Rijn’s A Girl at a Window. Remi Rough added the spectacular background which he based on the painting The Triumph of David by Nicholas Poussin. You can see Rembrandt’s original painting below while Poussin’s painting features further down in this article. (Street artists Phlegm and RUN also based their works on Poussin’s painting.)

Painting ‘A Girl at a Window’ by Rembrandt van Rijn
‘A Girl at a Window’ by Rembrandt van Rijn (1645) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

2. Dulwich street art: Remi Rough (no longer there)

Remi Rough street art in Dulwich, London, based on 'The Fall of the Rebel Angels' by Sebastiono Ricci
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Remi Rough

I found this impressive mural by Remi Rough during the guided Dulwich street art tour I joined when I revisited the area. Based on the spectacular The Fall of the Rebel Angels by Sebastiano Ricci, Rough’s artwork was painted on a garage near Dulwich Village. The garage has been knocked down now though so you can no longer see this piece in real life unfortunately. A real shame as it definitely is a great piece of art.

Painting 'The Fall of the Rebel Angels' by Sebastiano Ricci
‘The Fall of the Rebel Angels’ by Sebastiano Ricci (c. 1720) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

3. Street art in Dulwich: Conor Harrington (Spurling Road)

Conor Harrington street art mural in Dulwich, London, of two men about to fight and dressed in 17th-century clothing
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Conor Harrington (2013)

This piece by Irish painter and muralist Conor Harrington was one my main reason for travelling to Dulwich. I’m a big fan of this fantastic artist and had seen many photos of this mural on social media in previous years. Seeing this artwork in real life was definitely worth the trip! Having seen many of equally amazing Conor Harrington murals in Shoreditch, this was one of the largest pieces I had found.

You can find this mural by Conor Harrington opposite the East Dulwich Tavern. His contribution to the Dulwich Outdoor Gallery is a bit of an odd one as it’s not a clear reiteration of a classic painting. Instead, Harrington based his bare-knuckle boxers on the general concept of violence as portrayed in ‘The Massacre of the Innocents’ (1660) by Charles Le Brun and also at ‘A Stag at Sharkey’s by George Bellows 1909. Coincidentally, his signature style always feature figures from the Regency era (1811-1820), which corresponds with the time the Dulwich Picture Gallery originally opened.

4. Dulwich street art: Faith47 (197 Consort Road)

Faith47 street art mural in Dulwich, London, based on the painting ‘Europa and the Bull’ by Guido Reni
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Faith47 (2014)

Faith47 is without a doubt one of my favourite street artists. Considered as one of the top muralists in the world, Faith47 originally hails from South Africa but I’ve been fortunate to see her stunning artworks all over the world. From London to the Spanish city of Málaga and even Dunedin in New Zealand!

Trying to find her stunning mural in Dulwich took quite some effort. Located in an uninspiring and mostly residential neighbourhood, her interpretation of the painting Europa and the Bull by Guido Reni (c. 1640) was definitely worth the detour.

Painting ‘Europa and the Bull’ by Guido Reni
‘Europa and the Bull’ by Guido Reni (c. 1640) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

5. Dulwich street art: Pablo Delgado (corner of Grove Vale/Coppleston Road)

Small paste-up of cut out paper figures by Pablo Delgado on the pavement in Dulwich, London
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Pablo Delgado

It always gives me a great feeling of accomplishment to find the tiny artworks by Pablo Delgado as they’re so easy to miss. Despite being incredibly small, Delgado manages to incorporate many fine details in his work. What I especially enjoy about his small paste-ups is the sense of shadow his 2D characters appear to cast.

It’s very comical photographing his works in the streets as people just stare at me and wonder why I’m almost laying flat on the pavement. Unlike the (spray-)painted artworks, Delgado’s tiny paste-ups don’t last very long. By the time you read this, these delicate artworks are probably lost forever.

Delgado’s miniature street art in Dulwich are based on a mash-up of The Nurture of Jupiter by Nicolas Poussin (c.1636-7) and Princess Victoria aged Four by Stephen Poyntz Denning (1823).

tiny paste-up of drawn figures in 17th-century clothing by Pablo Delgado on the pavement in Dulwich, London

6. Dulwich street art: Stik (Hansler Road)

Stik street art mural based on ‘A Couple in a Landscape’ by Thomas Gainsborough as part of the Dulwich Outdoor Gallery
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Stik (2012)

This mural on the side of Property Inn is only one of many street artworks by Stik as part of the Dulwich Outdoor Gallery. Stik has always been one of my favourite London street artists. I’m therefore quite pleased that he was also the very first artist to participate in this ambitious urban art project. This mural by Stik on Hansler Road is based on A Couple in a Landscape by Thomas Gainsborough (c. 1753).

Painting ‘A Couple in a Landscape’ by Thomas Gainsborough
‘A Couple in a Landscape’ by Thomas Gainsborough (c. 1753) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

7. Street art in Dulwich: Stik (Blackwater Court)

Street art mural by Stik in Dulwich, London, based on ‘The Guardian Angel’ by Marcantonio Franceschini
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Stik (2012)

This cute and vibrant mural by Stik is located in Blackwater Court on Push Studios. It is based on the painting The Guardian Angel by Marcantonio Franceschini (1716).

Painting ‘The Guardian Angel’ by Marcantonio Franceschini
‘The Guardian Angel’ by Marcantonio Franceschini (1716) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

8. Dulwich street art: Stik and Beerens (Court Lane)

To find the amazing street art murals in Dulwich, you will have to venture further from the high street. I was surprised to find so many eye-catching murals in seemingly boring residential streets such as Court Lane. On 150 Court Lane, there are even artworks by two different street artists.

On the left in the photo below you’ll see a work by Stik which is based on the classic painting Eliza and Mary Davidson by Tilly Kettle (c. 1784). The sheep on the right is painted by Beerens. It’s one of three sheep he painted in the area, his interpretation of the three boys featured in the painting Three Boys by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (c. 1670). Scroll down to see the second sheep I found and the original painting by Murillo.

paintings by Stik and Beerens based on Murillo's 'Three Boys', painted on a residential home in Dulwich, London
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Stik (2012)
Painting ‘Eliza and Mary Davidson’ by Tilly Kettle
‘Eliza and Mary Davidson’ by Tilly Kettle (c. 1784) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

10. Dulwich street art: Beerens (Court Lane)

Beerens street art in Dulwich, London, based on Murillo's Three Boys
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Beerens

Above is the second sheep by Beerens I found on Court Lane. Representing the black boy in the painting by Spanish artist Murillo, you will need to look up to be able to spot this cute sheep. Beerens’s three sheep can be found on 175, 177 and 150 Court Lane. The sheep on number 175 is black and hungry, looking longingly at the white sheep eating lush grass opposite him. The sheep on number 150 is sly: it has a fox’s tail.

Painting ‘Three Boys’ by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
‘Three Boys’ by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (c. 1670) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

10. Street art in Dulwich: Phlegm (Goodrich Road)

Mural by Phlegm in Dulwich London based on ‘The Triumph of David’ by Nicholas Poussin
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Phlegm (2013)

Sheffield-based illustrator and muralist Phlegm is another artist I admire. His immersive show A Modern Bestiary was the first street art exhibition I ever visited. It was truly amazing and I’ve been a firm fan of his works ever since.

I took this photo of Phlegm’s mural on the corner of Barry Road and Goodrich Road with an old camera and in the dark. The quality therefore isn’t the best unfortunately. Phlegm based his work on the painting The Triumph of David by Nicholas Poussin (c. 1631-33). The artist RUN also painted his interpretation of the same painting which you will find below.

'Painting The Triumph of David’ by Nicholas Poussin
‘The Triumph of David’ by Nicholas Poussin (c. 1631-33) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

11. Dulwich street art project: RUN (Dulwich Village)

Mural by RUN in Dulwich, London, based on the painting ‘The Triumph of David’ by Nicholas Poussin
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: RUN (2014)

Painted on several pieces of hoardings in front of The Crown and Greyhound pub on 73 Dulwich Village, it is likely that this mural by Italian-born artist RUN no longer exist in Dulwich. Like Phlegm, he also based his work on the painting The Triumph of David by Nicholas Poussin.

While Phlegm merely focussed on the trumpeter, RUN actually captured the entire scene as seen in the original painting (which is quite grim as we see Goliath’s decapitated head being carried around on a stake). I chose this specific section of RUN’s painting so you can see the two different interpretations of these two amazing muralists.

12. Dulwich street art: Phlegm (Herne Hill)

Phegm street art mural in Dulwich, London, based on 'Bond of Union' by Escher
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Phlegm (2015)

Phlegm’s second artwork in the Dulwich Outdoor Gallery is based on the black and white drawing Bond of Union by M.C. Escher (1956). Specialising in mind-boggling optical effects, Escher’s artwork was displayed in the temporary exhibition The Amazing World of M. C. Escher at Dulwich Picture Gallery.

Black and white drawing ‘Bond of Union’ by M.C. Escher
‘Bond of Union’ by M.C. Escher (1956) (Source: Pedro Ribeiro Simões / Flickr)

13. Dulwich street art: Mad C (381 Lordship Lane)

Mad C street art mural in Dulwich, London, based on the painting ‘Venetia, Lady Digby, on her Deathbed’ by Sir Anthony van Dyck
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Mad C (2015)

This eye-catching mural by German artist Mad C can be found in the car park of the Plough Inn. I really love this mural which is a modern take on the classic painting Venetia, Lady Digby, on her Deathbed by Sir Anthony van Dyck (1633). You can see that while the woman is painted in an abstract way, Mad C kept the withering rose and its falling rose petals realistic.

Painting 'Venetia, Lady Digby, on her Deathbed’ by Sir Anthony van Dyck
‘Venetia, Lady Digby, on her Deathbed’ by Sir Anthony van Dyck (1633) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

14. Dulwich street art: Mear One (Lordship Lane)

Mear One street art mural in Dulwich, London, based on ‘The Virgin on the Rosary’ by Bartolomé Estéban Murillo
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Mear One (2013)

Painte on the side of The Lordship Pub, corner of Lordship Lane and Pellet Road, this mural is by renowned LA graffiti artist and muralist Mear One. Despite its enormous size, it took me a few minutes to locate this artwork as the online map mentioned another name. That’s why it took me a few minutes to find this mural. Featuring the word ‘Equality’ in big letters, Mear One’s painting is a modern take on The Virgin on the Rosary by Bartolomé Estéban Murillo (c. 1765-1760).

‘The Madonna of the Rosary’ by Bartolomé Estéban Murillo (c. 1680) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

15. Street art in Dulwich: Beerens (Blackwater Street)

Dulwich street art by Beerens of a deer pierced by an arrow
Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: Beerens

In addition to the three sheep painted on Court Lane, Beerens painted yet another artwork in Dulwich. This wounded deer painted on the shop Mrs Robinson, on the corner of Blackwater Street, is Beerens’s interpretation of Saint Sebastian by Antonio Bellucci (1716-18).

‘Saint Sebastian’ by Antonio Bellucci (1716-18) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

I found most of the works, but due to the darkness and cold, I couldn’t finish the entire art trail. You can find more artworks and information about them in this Google Arts & Culture article about the incredible Dulwich Outdoor Gallery.

I hope you enjoyed this extensive blog post about the amazing street art in Dulwich! Which of these artworks was your favourite? Let me know in a comment below!
Thanks, Zarina xx

Want to find the fabulous Dulwich street art murals for yourself? Then pin this article for future reference!

8 thoughts on “Dulwich Outdoor Gallery: When Street Art Meets Fine Art

  1. Dear Dutch Girl, How nice to read this blog post and hear that you discovered Dulwich Outdoor Gallery and enjoyed it. I set it up, and would be very interested to know at what point did you realise that the wall by Conor Harrington was part of a wider collection of walls all with one theme – based on art works at Dulwich Picture Gallery. You have also done a lot of research – did you come across this video with interviews with many of the artists,https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iylVaZTQ93k and perhaps discover I have written a couple of books about the project? http://www.amazon.co.uk/Street-Art-Fine-Ingrid-Beazley/dp/0956873855/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1453035051&sr=8-1&keywords=ingrid+beazley
    You are right about the mushrooms having nothing to do with paintings in DPG. Christiaan was around during the street art festival and wanted to put some up so I suggested he put them near the murals in order to mark them. One has gone up recently on top of the East Dulwich Tavern to mark the Harrington wall opposite.
    Have you been down to Dulwich again as you suggested you might? Did you make Dulwich Picture Gallery itself when you came before.? If the answer to both these is no, I would be happy to meet up with you at DPG sometime and show you the paintings that inspired Dulwich Outdoor Gallery. I have worked as a teacher at DPG for 20 years so know the paintings backwards!
    The most recent wall is on DOG Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DulwichOutdoorGallery/?ref=hl

  2. Great street art!
    Thanks for the links to the artist’s homepages, they make fantastic work!
    It must be great to live somewhere and see these murals while walking outside. Unfortunately there are none here in Hoofddorp 🙁
    Thanks again! Keep up the good work, I really like these posts!
    Esther

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