Could you imagine watching a 24-hour long film without a main plot and with clocks as its main protagonists? Although this principle might sound like it could be a tedious ordeal, Christian Marclay’s impressive video collage ‘The Clock’ consisting of about 12,000 film and television clips actually makes for an unforgettable experience. This special video work opened at Tate Modern on Friday 14 September and I went to see it yesterday morning, spending four hours in Christian Marclay’s carefully curated cinematic world.

When was the last time you received a letter in the post? Today, with so many different ways to communicate, it’s never been easier to stay in touch with your friends and family (or even people you don’t really know). My visit to The Postal Museum yesterday made me reflect on the lost art of letter writing and also taught me that delivering post 500 years ago was an extremely dangerous profession!

London is a great city trip destination, but sometimes the busy metropolis can also get a bit overwhelming. You could retreat in one of the numerous beautiful parks dotted around the city for a moment, but why not combine a free and unique public art trail with explorations of a far less touristy side of London? The Line art trail runs between the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and O2 Arena and is suitable for families, art lovers, ramblers and even thrillseekers!

Ever wanted to experience the early morning hustle and bustle of Smithfield Market, the last surviving market in central London? Or what about learning more about the history of Soho and how its vibrant music scene in the 1960s influenced David Bowie’s career? These are just two examples of the 40+ guided tours that will take place from early morning till late night on 25 May all across London. The goal of this day is to raise £20,000 in 20 hours for the MS Trust: 20in20.

Zombies, vampires, the undead: these are all creatures that make up for successful franchise films, and all were originally born from gothic literature. The first ever Gothic novel, The Castle of Otranto (1764), was written by British author Horace Walpole who found the inspiration for the novel in his gothic castle in west London. After an elaborate restoration, it is now possible to visit this extraordinary and eccentric historical house.